Block Chain 102 ... how is it relevant? - an agricultural application and the climate

 This pic is in a land in Australia that receives less than a cup of water a year. The left field is without regeneration practises. The right is with these. It is the soil that has been improved to hold the water. can you see the difference?

This pic is in a land in Australia that receives less than a cup of water a year. The left field is without regeneration practises. The right is with these. It is the soil that has been improved to hold the water. can you see the difference?

Blockchain and the climate...

The application for agriculture is identity validation for premium markets wanting to ensure the product they are paying a premium for that originates in a far off or remote location, and must move through potentially corrupt ports, is actually the thing that arrives.  That, at the many checkpoints, there has been no possible human error as data entry because it is all done over the internet via the code with the validation encrypted in the code through the global network.

A premium will always be paid for food, fibre and proteins derived from the best soils with the most dense nutrients. Ironically, these soils also resolve our atmospheric CO2 issue by returning our wasted carbon back into the soil so our aim is to increase this activity!

Farms that use regenerative practise use up to 4 times less water because the soils becomes like a sponge of microbes and community all retaining the water.

The farms that do this will also most oft be the ones who treat the animals with best practise and humanity. This is not only in the organic community and it is a misread of the many great farmers out there who practise without certification but with a dedication to quality that get missed in this discussion.

Farmers are business people and to do this, they either own the most fertile, expensive land usually through inheritance or they must develop it with labour intensive practises that simply don’t add up in a conventional market that the hungry billions of people globally are willing or able to pay. So premium markets and their integrity security become the focus for soil improvement; something blockchain can potentially resolve.

You might question this saying but surely someone can still swap the item out for an inferior product? That’s where the creation of DNA and Phenotype scanners are being developed. So that within the code there can be the original DNA fingerprinting of the land and its unique markers that can be scanned, encrypted for transport and authenticated at the receipt end. 

Seeing the product is moving through the checkpoints and the farmer is being paid instantly using crypto currencies is currently already being used by groups like agunity.com which operate in several poor, rural countries changing the economic basis of marginal farmers by simply giving them a mobile phone (and a solar battery to charge it) so the farmer can now get and verify that their produce gets to their buyer and receive instant payment. The lives of these farmers is altering from as little as $300 a month to $1000 with just this one simple implementation.

As for internet connectivity issue (many farms are a long way from a mobile tower or any ability to upload via satellite) it is more a problem in a vast country like Australia with a small population but as Ag starts to see the use of technology to gather data that can take the guesswork out of farming, we feel sure the funds to alter telecommunications and transport infrastructure will bring this up into a competitive market. At present the big farmers use radio frequency on farm and upload from the farmhouse. Even these two big areas are the areas of industry that blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies are revolutionising!

Ok enough on farming and blockchain. Back to crypto! next blog.. its all on crypto stuff.